US destroyer, Australian frigate jointly operates in South China Sea

News Sourced

United States Navy Arleigh Burke-class guided-missile destroyer USS John S. McCain (DDG 56) joined the Royal Australian Navy Anzac-class frigate HMAS Ballarat (FFH 155) during integrated operations in the South China Sea, Oct. 27.

US NAVY photo

Both ships conducted maneuvering drills, integrated tactical training, and warfighting scenarios while transiting together. McCain and Ballarat also conducted a combined transit to the Andaman Sea through the Strait of Malacca.

“We find tremendous value in sailing alongside our close allies of Australia, as well as our other allies and partners, in support of a free, open, secure, and prosperous Indo-Pacific Region,” said Cmdr. Ryan T. Easterday, McCain’s commanding officer. “The training we are conducting while we operate together helps both ships’ crews improve their mariner skills and warfighting proficiency, in addition to the interoperability benefits we accrue by working together as a team.”

Prior to joining Ballarat, McCain conducted trilateral maritime operations alongside the JS Kirisame (DD 104) of the Japan Maritime Self Defense Force, and the HMAS Arunta (FFH 151) of the Royal Australian Navy. These exercises aim to further strengthen interoperability between allied navies.

“Integrated maritime operations allow us to exercise our capabilities with our allies,” said Lt. Anthony Haywood, the operations officer aboard McCain. “Being in the 7th Fleet area of operations, we’re constantly working with our partner nations to keep solidifying that bond, structure and alliance.”

Following their Strait of Malacca transit, McCain and Ballarat are scheduled to continue operations in the Andaman Sea with multi-domain warfare training, cross-deck helicopter operations, and a joint gunnery exercise.

“It is important to continue training on the basics as well as complex taskings, that is why we do these exercises,” Haywood continued. “Establish our playbook so that when we face real-time situations, it’s muscle memory and we are ready.”

Credible, ready maritime partners help to preserve peace and prevent conflict. The U.S. Navy’s long history of training together with the Royal Australian Navy is an example of the cooperative relationships that are critical to ensuring the safety of sea lanes and security on the world’s oceans.

Commanding officer of Ballarat, Cmdr. Antony Pisani welcomed the cooperative deployment with USS McCain.

“The cooperative deployment allows HMAS Ballarat and broader Navy to hone our warfare and mariner skills and develop our ability to operate and communicate together,” said Cmdr. Pisani. “The shared mutual trust both navies have for each other, ensure such activities are mutually beneficial enhancing the readiness and preparedness of the ships that undertake them. This deployment reinforces our commitment and right to exercise freedom of navigation and overflight under international law across our Indo-Pacific region.”

John S. McCain is underway conducting operations in support of a free and open Indo-Pacific, while assigned to Destroyer Squadron (DESRON) 15, the Navy’s largest forward-deployed DESRON and the U.S. 7th Fleet’s principal surface force. U.S. 7th Fleet conducts forward-deployed naval operations in support of U.S. national interests in the Indo-Pacific area of operations. As the U.S. Navy’s largest numbered fleet, 7th Fleet interacts with 35 other maritime nations to build partnerships that foster maritime security, promote stability, and prevent conflict. CPF.NAVY.MIL