DOJ eyes completion of Jolo shooting probe in October

News Sourced

State prosecutors on Thursday said they may resolve this month the criminal charges against Jolo police officers involved in the killing of four military intelligence officers last June.

Senior Deputy State Prosecutor Richard Anthony Fadullon told reporters that “barring any extensions and any unforeseen causes for delay”, the Department of Justice (DOJ) may resolve the case within the month.

Fadullon said counter-affidavits had been submitted by respondents over a week ago and prosecutors are awaiting the possible filing of a reply and rejoinder.

Last August, the DOJ ordered the policemen implicated in the shooting of four army intelligence officers in Jolo, Sulu to answer the criminal charges filed against them.

Charges of murder and planting of evidence were filed by the National Bureau of Investigation (NBI) Officer-in-charge Eric Distor for preliminary investigation by prosecutors following the findings of the NBI Western Mindanao Regional Office and Death Investigation Division.

The NBI Western Mindanao Regional Office composite team headed by Yehlen C. Agus also recommended neglect of duty under the doctrine of command responsibility against the Sulu Police Provincial Director, Police Drug Enforcement Unit chief, and the Jolo chief of police.

The four Army intelligence operatives killed in the shooting incident involving nine police officers in Jolo bore gunshot wounds on their backs.
Killed during the incident were Maj. Marvin Indammog, 39; Capt. Irwin Managuelod, 33; Sgt. Jaime Velasco, 38; and Cpl. Abdal Asula, 33. The four were tailing four terrorist suicide bombers when the shooting happened. Asula was buried in Sulu according to Muslim rites.

The nine relieved policemen — S/Sgt. Almudzrin Hadjaruddin, Pat. Alkajal Mandangan, Pat. Rajiv Putalan, Senior M/Sgt. Abdelzhimar Padjiri, M/Sgt. Hanie U Baddiri, S/Sgt. Iskandar Susulan, S/Sgt. Ernisar Sappal, Cpl. Sulki Andaki, and Pat. Mohammad Nur Pasani — are currently under restrictive custody at Camp Crame in Quezon City. PNA.GOV.PH